Questions around Zim delegation

Even in the twilight world which is ANC politics, it is nevertheless bizarre that the ruling party has sent a delegation to talk to its counterpart in Zimbabwe, Zanu-PF, about "challenges faced by both South Africa and Zimbabwe and discuss how it impacts the economic, political and social stability of both countries". The fact that it is a party-to-party discussion suggests a bypassing of official government structures, which is not unexpected from two organisations which believe they will rule as de facto one-party states until, as Jacob Zuma famously said, "Jesus returns". The ANC has, for decades, turned a blind...
Even in the twilight world which is ANC politics, it is nevertheless bizarre that the ruling party has sent a delegation to talk to its counterpart in Zimbabwe, Zanu-PF, about "challenges faced by both South Africa and Zimbabwe and discuss how it impacts the economic, political and social stability of both countries".

The fact that it is a party-to-party discussion suggests a bypassing of official government structures, which is not unexpected from two organisations which believe they will rule as de facto one-party states until, as Jacob Zuma famously said, "Jesus returns".

The ANC has, for decades, turned a blind eye to some of the egregious human rights violations in Zimbabwe under the rule of Robert Mugabe … and has continued doing so for his successor, Emmerson Mnangagwa.

Those abuses – and the concomitant collapse of the Zimbabwean economy – have seen as many as five million people (by the ANC's own admission) fleeing across the border into South Africa to seek a better life. The visit suggests the parties' common interests may also extend to their enemies – which, in the case of Zanu-PF, include any opposition, the media and foreign governments.

Could this be a sign of our own ruling party's real beliefs? Even more bizarre is the fact that the delegation is headed by Ace Magashule, the party secretary-general, and former water and sanitation minister Nomvula Mokonyane, both linked to state capture; as well as Tony Yengeni, a corruption convict.

Accompanying them is defence minister Nosiwe Mapisa-Nqakula, whose troops brutally cracked down on civilians during the first part of the Covid-19 lockdown. What is certain is that this delegation is unlikely to call for softer action on political dissent in Zimbabwe – nor to call on Zanu-PF to stop looting their country…

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