The All Hearts Foundation (AHF) was founded four years ago as an initiative to save a pack of 16 Canadian timber wolves. Since then, they have become a safe haven not only for the wolves but feral cats, dogs, a horse, sheep, parrots, pigs and several other animals. Among them is Shimbungu, a dog who broke his spine after being hit by a car in a small Namibian town. AHF managed to get him the help he required and he now seems to be slowly regaining feeling in his unused legs and showing signs of recovery. Being a non-profit organisation,...
The All Hearts Foundation (AHF) was founded four years ago as an initiative to save a pack of 16 Canadian timber wolves. Since then, they have become a safe haven not only for the wolves but feral cats, dogs, a horse, sheep, parrots, pigs and several other animals.

Among them is Shimbungu, a dog who broke his spine after being hit by a car in a small Namibian town. AHF managed to get him the help he required and he now seems to be slowly regaining feeling in his unused legs and showing signs of recovery.

Being a non-profit organisation, AHF's main source of income comes from visits from the general public and school groups to their animal park in Hartbeespoort.

The nationwide lockdown to contain the spread of Covid-19 left AHF's grounds empty and the donations few and far apart.

Pics: Safe haven to run with the wolves

Pics: Safe haven to run with the wolves

Pics: Safe haven to run with the wolves

Pics: Safe haven to run with the wolves

Pics: Safe haven to run with the wolves


Since the start of lockdown Level 2 and movement and various economic activities were again permitted, AHF has reopened but only by appointment while strictly adhering to Covid-19 rules and regulations.

"Covid-19 has had an impact on everybody in the wildlife and tourism market. We speak for our friends in the wildlife facilities, because for example, Lion Park has assisted us with meat donations. They help us where they can, [even though] nobody looks after [them]," said co-owner Lexi Austen.

Owners Lexi and Ronnie Austen's goals are to educate the public on the animals they care for, specifically the wolves.

"Our main focus is the wolves and on educating people why they  shouldn't have them as pets. The reason for that is because they run tracks in gardens and destroy gardens. They like to be pack animals [but] some people would only have one, where it shouldn't be, because they will try to find a pack," Ronnie said.

AHF offers a unique experience on their plot in Hartbeespoort as visitors can get up close and personal with full grown Canadian timber wolves while being permitted to touch and interact with them, as well as many of the other animals on the premises.

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