The new direction for Formula 1

This past Sunday's Belgian Grand Prix certainly could not be considered memorable. A few midfield fights, a dominant run from Lewis Hamilton and a continuation of Ferrari's terrible woes, was the short summary. Let us hope this weekend's Italian Grand Prix at Monza will be more of a race. As you are probably aware, all 10 teams, Formula 1 and the FIA have finally signed the new Concorde Agreement which should bring a sustainable future for the sport with forthcoming new regulations and budget caps. There must have been some hard bargaining, as just weeks ago Mercedes was not happy...
This past Sunday's Belgian Grand Prix certainly could not be considered memorable. A few midfield fights, a dominant run from Lewis Hamilton and a continuation of Ferrari's terrible woes, was the short summary. Let us hope this weekend's Italian Grand Prix at Monza will be more of a race.

As you are probably aware, all 10 teams, Formula 1 and the FIA have finally signed the new Concorde Agreement which should bring a sustainable future for the sport with forthcoming new regulations and budget caps. There must have been some hard bargaining, as just weeks ago Mercedes was not happy to put their signature on the document, but finally it was all done and dusted.

Within days of this, Renault issued a statement requesting withdrawal of their appeals lodged against the stewards' decisions in relation to Racing Point's brake duct saga. Among other things Renault's statement said: "Reaching this strategic objective, in the context of the new Concorde Agreement, was our priority. The controversy of the start of this season should be put behind us, as we need to focus on the remainder of an intense and unique championship."

What happened to Team Chief Cyril Abiteboul's recent suggestion that Racing Point lose all points earned this season? Was this turnaround a condition of the Concorde Agreement, or the possible influence of Renault's new CEO Luca de Meo? Perhaps it is another mystery akin to the FIA/Ferrari agreement over engine performance, and we will probably never know.

It is hard to believe that one of the last bastions of British Formula One heritage has become the property of an American investment company. I refer to Williams. Gone are the days of intrepid privateers, when many British racing teams were owned by one or two enthusiasts and took on the might of the big-budget factory teams.

In 1969 Frank Williams, founded Williams Racing Cars and then in 1977 he and engineer Patrick Head formed Williams Grand Prix Engineering Ltd. The team was to win nine constructors' and seven drivers' championships over the years, an incredible achievement.

In recent years, success has sadly disappeared, with the team scoring just one point in the constructers' title chase last year and none so far this season. This has led to a loss of income and consequently the sale to US based investment company Dorilton Capital.

Dorilton's chairperson, Matthew Savage, is reported as saying: "We are delighted to have invested in Williams and we are extremely excited by the prospects for the business. We believe we are the ideal partner for the company due to our flexible and patient investment style, that will allow the team to focus fully on its objective of returning to the front of the grid.

"We look forward to working with the Williams team in carrying out a detailed review of the business. We also recognise the world class facilities at Grove and confirm that there are no plans to relocate."

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